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Sophie Dickinson

Sophie Dickinson

Interim Travel Writer, Time Out

Sophie Dickinson is an Interim Travel Writer on Time Out's international team. She's especially interested in writing about weird culture, delicious food, strange buildings, and the best things to do around the world.

Follow her on Twitter: @sdickinson8

Articles (34)

The 18 best and coolest seaside towns in the UK

The 18 best and coolest seaside towns in the UK

If there‚Äôs one thing the UK has a lot of, it‚Äôs coastline. Our island nation is edged with some brilliant beaches (several of the world‚Äôs most beautiful beaches, in fact) ‚Äď and many of the towns and villages clustered around them are having a renaissance right now.¬† You can forget the clich√©s of rain, pebbles, chippies and faded towns well past their heyday. These ace seaside towns come with cutting-edge arts scenes and destination restaurants making British seaside holidays cool again. From arty hotspots in Cornwall to quaint fishing towns in Wales and secluded coves in Scotland, consider this your ultimate UK seaside guide. This way for sun, sand, sea air and all the ingredients you need for brilliant beachside breaks this summer.¬† Heading out from the capital on your jaunt? Check out our guide to the best seaside towns near London.

11 of the cheapest cities to visit in Europe on a budget

11 of the cheapest cities to visit in Europe on a budget

Travel is well and truly back, people. Covid testing for tourists is increasingly being scrapped across the board, and travellers are practically being ushered into the once-bustling cities of Europe. But the thing is, lots of us are still strapped for cash after two years of uncertainty.  The good news is this: there are plenty of interesting and affordable locations on the Continent that you can visit without breaking the bank. Plus, a load of them are off the beaten track, meaning you won’t have to fight your way through crowds to find the best bits. We found out the average price of an Airbnb in each place, and cross-referenced that with data from financial comparison site Finder to work out where you can get a discount pint, too. From the ruin-filled city of Argos in Greece to the foodie-heaven of Graz in Austria, here are 11 of the cheapest cities to visit in Europe. RECOMMENDED: The 16 best city breaks in Europe for 2022

Four places in Northern Ireland every ‚ÄėGame of Thrones‚Äô fan must visit

Four places in Northern Ireland every ‚ÄėGame of Thrones‚Äô fan must visit

Ah, Game of Thrones.¬†There was a time when you couldn‚Äôt escape the¬†twisty, expansive, sex-filled fantasy world, and the scheming, ambitious characters who lived there. No matter what you thought of the final season, fans have consequently mourned the end of the show for years. And for good reason: it was really bloody good. A real highlight, of course, was the spectacular worldbuilding of George R R Martin. From the unforgiving Kingsroad to the mysterious Winterfell forest, it all looked pretty astonishing on screen, too. But where exactly was the series shot? Well, much of the action in fact took place in¬†Northern Ireland, one of the four nations that make up the UK, and now many of the IRL filming locations can actually be visited by the public. From the expansive official studio tour to the eerie Dark Hedges and the spooky Cushendun Caves, here‚Äôs how to see Westeros at its most magical ‚Äď without having to dig out that boxset.

The 7 best places to see the Northern Lights around the world

The 7 best places to see the Northern Lights around the world

The Northern Lights (aka the aurora borealis) should be on every traveller‚Äôs celestial bucket list. TikTok and Instagram are full of aurora-chasers who spend considerable amounts of time tracking geomagnetic storms in order to see swirling streaks of pink, green, yellow and blue light up the sky. Typically, the Northern Lights are visible in places like Iceland, Norway and Canada, but every now and again, the northern reaches of the USA and UK get a display, too. The lights might look magical, but there‚Äôs a rather unromantic scientific explanation for them. The Northern Lights may appear as an arc that curves across the sky, or ribbons of pink, yellow and green that move through the darkness. They light up the sky when gaseous particles in the Earth‚Äôs atmosphere and charged particles from the sun‚Äôs atmosphere collide, and are blown towards the earth by solar wind.It‚Äôs because of this that we can sort of predict where you can spot them. They‚Äôre usually deflected by the planet‚Äôs magnetic field ‚Äď but this is weaker at the poles. That means somewhere within the Arctic Circle is your best bet. In the southern hemisphere, they‚Äôre called aurora australis, but they‚Äôre much trickier to spot from land. For the best viewing experience, you‚Äôre going to want to choose a dark night, so looking skywards between November and March is recommended. Pick a night when there‚Äôs a new moon, and make sure it‚Äôs cloudless and that there‚Äôs no light pollution.¬† So, are you ready to see something pretty

The 8 best new museums opening around the world in 2022

The 8 best new museums opening around the world in 2022

There was a time, in the seemingly endless lockdowns of last year (and the year before that), where it seemed like IRL culture had just stopped. The idea of a brand-new gallery popping up didn’t just seem unlikely, it felt impossible. But the worlds of art and heritage didn’t actually cease to exist. Across the globe, artists continued to create strange, groundbreaking works. Galleries battled through. And now 2022 is here (and the virus appears to be fading), a whole host of new museums (new!) are opening their doors for the very first time. Here are eight of the most exciting museum openings of the year.RECOMMENDED: 6 really, really small museums around the world

6 really, really small (and really, really good) museums around the world

6 really, really small (and really, really good) museums around the world

Sometimes, art, culture and history have to be consumed in small doses. Sure, there’s something majestic about traipsing around Paris or Florence, cramming in every gallery and famous bit of architecture you can. But that can get exhausting. Happily, these pocket-sized museums allow you to get your culture fix without spending all day doing it. Whether it’s an exhibition in a classic British telephone box or a collection of curious New York items displayed in an elevator shaft, you’ll discover that in many cases the museum location is just as weird as the stuff inside. Good thing. Ready to seek out some seriously obscure culture? Here are six of the best really, really small (and really, really good) museums across the globe. RECOMMENDED: The 8 best new museums opening around the world in 2022

Ano novo, tanta coisa nova: os melhores destinos para 2022

Ano novo, tanta coisa nova: os melhores destinos para 2022

Teletrabalho obrigat√≥rio. Escolas encerradas. E n√≥s a pensar em viagens. Claro¬†‚Äď vale tudo para n√£o desanimar. E¬†em 2022 n√£o v√£o faltar raz√Ķes para dar a volta ao mundo. Aberturas de museus impressionantes, exposi√ß√Ķes campe√£s de likes nas redes sociais, pe√ßas de teatro imersivas, festivais de m√ļsica e at√© um parque tem√°tico de Game of Thrones: todas s√£o √≥ptimas desculpas para apanhar um avi√£o e conhecer uma nova cidade ou revisitar um s√≠tio onde fomos felizes. Seleccion√°mos 22 destinos e coisas para descobrir em 2022, um g√©nero de bucket list do ano novo, em tom de esperan√ßa no que a√≠ vem. Recomendado:¬†Precisa de ajuda para cumprir as suas resolu√ß√Ķes de ano novo? Aqui vai ¬†

5 places around the world where cats have basically taken charge

5 places around the world where cats have basically taken charge

Cat owners make a pretty weird deal with their pets. Thinking about buying your kitten a lush, luxurious basket to sleep in? They‚Äôll almost certainly prefer a cardboard box. Feeding them line-caught tuna rather than a standard tin of food? Don‚Äôt think that means you‚Äôre guaranteed a cuddle.It‚Äôs that fickle, independent mindset that draws people to cats, though. And in some places around the world, they‚Äôve have been given free rein of entire towns because of that oh-so-charming stubbornness. Here are five locations across the globe where the cats may have started out as pest control ‚Äď but are now basically in charge. Dog lovers, look away now.

13 songs that got us (awkwardly) dancing again in 2021

13 songs that got us (awkwardly) dancing again in 2021

Whether or not we felt comfortable enough to hit the club, 2021 was the year¬†we got our¬†groove back. Hell, many of us had given it a go at home. We‚Äôd played that Dua Lipa album to death. We‚Äôd tried, desperately, to make ‚Äėlockdown discos‚Äô a thing.¬†Last year, some of the bigger legends among us even¬†attended virtual NYE parties.¬†It was good fun, until it got boring ‚Äď fast. Though much of the world has slipped in and out of lockdown this year, there were moments when most of us were able to get back on the dancefloor. The pre-night hype, the thump-thump-thump,¬†the endless spilled drinks: by God, it felt¬†good. And even if we weren‚Äôt quite up to a night on the town, as 2021 went on, there were certainly many more reasons to regain that spring in our step. The vaccine rollout sped up. We saw our loved ones again. And we danced ‚Äď in bars, on street corners, and yes, at home. So wherever we¬†wound up, however we¬†got there, here are 13 songs that got Time Out writers¬†dancing again¬†this year. RECOMMENDED: 15 really, really great books that got us through 2021

15 really, really great books that got us through 2021

15 really, really great books that got us through 2021

Few sensations beat completing that epic¬†volume¬†that‚Äôs been sitting on your shelf for months. And this year ‚Äď this patchy, patchy year ‚Äď many of us finally did it. We found ourselves trapped at home, desperate for things to do. And actually, turns out, when it came to it, that book wasn‚Äôt so intimidating after all. But not only did we simply have more time to enjoy stuff like reading, we also went out of our way to do it because we needed an escape. We needed to be transported¬†to new worlds,¬†to open our¬†eyes to new things, to escape the undeniable bleakness of reality. For many us, films, TV shows and books were our lifeline¬†through the roughest of times. So, as 2021 comes to a close, we asked our editors around the world ‚Äď literary nerds, one and all ‚Äď to recommend one book that really resonated with them¬†over the past 12 months. From old classics we really should‚Äôve got round to before to new releases that properly rocked, here are the books that got us through the second (at times nice, but generally godawful) year of the pandemic. We hope you enjoy them, too.RECOMMENDED: The¬†20 best films of¬†2021¬†and the best TV shows we binged this year

The 22 best new things to do in the world in 2022

The 22 best new things to do in the world in 2022

The last time we made this list was in the heady days of January 2020. Remember them? There’d been rumblings of a virus originating in a wet market in Wuhan, but life was pretty much normal in most parts of the world. We did our thing. We made plans. We looked forward to a whole load of new cultural stuff happening around the world that year. Except basically none of it did. Music, art, theatre: all involve gathering loads of people together in often crowded spaces. Not good during the Panny D. Big openings were cancelled. Festival season was a write-off. We even stopped writing about going out altogether and rebranded as something called Time In. Throughout it all, our planners looked depressingly empty. But now, happily, we live in a world where vaccines have allowed things to return to some semblance of normality. And while we skipped a 2021 edition of this definitive global events and openings calendar, we’re pretty confident that almost all of the amazing things you’ll find below will happen next year. So, Omi C permitting (someone had to start calling it that), here are the 22 best new things to do in the world in 2022, from massive new museums to huge gigs, theatre shows and art exhibitions you won’t want to miss. RECOMMENDED: The 16 best city breaks in Europe for 2022

The 23 best new restaurants that opened around the world in 2021

The 23 best new restaurants that opened around the world in 2021

Does anyone else feel like new restaurant openings hit differently in 2021?¬†We‚Äôve always been the first in line to try the buzzy new spot on the block (then tell you about it),¬†but these days,¬†we recognise that opening a restaurant is a Herculean task worthy of celebration. Despite the odds stacked against them, new restaurants are popping up all over the world right now, proving just how resilient¬†the hospitality industry really is. So as part of this year‚Äôs¬†Time Out Love Local Awards, we asked you to¬†tell us your favourite¬†new¬†places to eat.¬†The stories¬†of the ones you picked are¬†remarkable, too ‚Äď from long-awaited openings to¬†lockdown daydreams, every spot on this list is praise-worthy. Ready to dig in? Grab a glass, queue up a reservation and join us in celebrating the best new restaurants of 2021.¬† RECOMMENDED: 14 cool museums and other culture spots that opened around the world in 2021

Listings and reviews (2)

Bibo Shoreditch

Bibo Shoreditch

4 out of 5 stars

Bibo is big on style. It‚Äôs sleek, without trying too hard for the Instagram crowd. Think: terracotta-toned, faux-adobe walls, Scandi-style drinking glasses that have an enigmatic coloured bead inside, and a vast, rose-gold, mirrored bar.¬† That stylishness was on show in¬†the food presentation, too. The tapas dishes show plenty of intricate, artistic touches. Bibo‚Äôs¬†patatas bravas ‚Äď a Spanish staple, usually a bowl of crispy spuds, slathered in a sloppy tomato sauce ‚Äď was instead attentively designed. Each perfectly round potato was lined up like a carb-heavy game of four-in-a-row, with a tiny, swirly hat of aioli balanced on each one, sprinkled with the tiniest flecks of basil. They were delightful.¬† We also ordered the grilled avocado salad, which was, again, not a tumbled-together tangle of lettuce and cucumber but a delicate sea of avocado boats, sailing on a feta foam. It was extremely tasty, but a bit on the expensive side, what with it being ¬£13 for just¬†four small avo halves on the dish. As a vegetarian, I left the oxtail brioche (helpfully described as ‚Äėvery oxtaily‚Äô) and the cod fritters to my boyfriend. He enjoyed both: the top of the brioche was a well for a gooey, meaty gravy; the cod fritters were just very posh, surprisingly yellow fish goujons. The vegetarian equivalent, porcini croquetas, were evidently much better: bursting with a creamy, umami mash and perfectly crispy. We ordered a second plate, and I genuinely considered getting a third.¬† I heard more Pete

‚ÄėTokyo Rose‚Äô review

‚ÄėTokyo Rose‚Äô review

3 out of 5 stars

The true story¬†behind ‚ÄėTokyo Rose‚Äô feels¬†surprisingly¬†obscure. Iva Toguri was a Japanese-American radio host in¬†Tokyo during the Second World War, who reached near-mythical status¬†thanks to¬†her broadcasts of pro-Japanese disinformation across the South Pacific and North America.¬†As a piece of history, it¬†feels ripe for rediscovery ‚Ästalthough transforming it into a two-hour musical is a tricky ask.¬† The¬†show¬†begins with lively, ‚ÄėHairspray‚Äô-esque songs like ‚ÄėHello America‚Äô, which jauntily whack¬†us.¬†with all the key dates and details.¬†It feels for a while that Maryhee Yoon and Cara Baldwin‚Äôs writing is too obvious, as we‚Äôre introduced to a cast that includes a posh British officer, a pipe-smoking lawyer, and a cartoonish presiding judge.¬† But¬†Hannah Benson‚Äôs production soon becomes more interesting. We¬†learn pretty early on that¬†Tokyo Rose was in fact a moniker given to all female broadcasters in Japan. But the US doggedly pursued¬†its own¬†citizen Toguri as the ‚Äėreal‚Äô propagandist. Post-war, we see her charged with treason and the story is interspersed with moments from¬†her trial.¬†Post-war, Toguri is charged with treason and the story is interspersed with moments from that trial. The fight to clear her name takes decades, and we watch as both Japan and American officials accuse her of being a traitor. ‚ÄėTokyo Rose‚Äô excels when it allows the genuinely impressive voice of Maya Britto to properly soar as Toguri. Lucy Park plays¬†a series of¬†comedic roles well, too, in what is a largel

News (278)

Revealed: these are officially the world’s most picturesque hotels

Revealed: these are officially the world’s most picturesque hotels

After two years of on-off travel restrictions scuppering holiday after holiday, finally the end of the pandemic seems to be in sight. That means many of us are now planning splashiest summer getaways ever ‚Äď and we‚Äôre looking to stay somewhere seriously impressive. Happily, photo printing firm¬†Infiki has just released a new study revealing the most picturesque¬†hotels in the world. To do this, they created a list of the world‚Äôs most popular holiday destinations, then trawled through location hashtags on Instagram to find the most posted-about hotels. So, where came top? That would be the¬†Burj Al Arab¬†Jumeirah in Dubai, which has already been tagged 2.55 million times on Instagram so far this year.¬†Next up is¬†Marina Bay¬†Sands in Singapore, which has racked up 1.88 million posts in 2022. In third place was¬†Caesar‚Äôs Palace in Las Vegas, with 1.57 million tags. And you know what? The Gambling Capital of the World in fact had four entries in the top ten ‚Äď impressive, impressive stuff.Want to know where else is hot right now? Here is the top ten in full: Burj Al Arab Jumeirah, Dubai, UAE Marina Bay Sands, Singapore Caesar‚Äôs Palace, Las Vegas, USA MGM Grand, Las Vegas, USA Atlantis, The Palm, Dubai, UAE Wynn Las Vegas, Las Vegas, USA The Venetian,¬†Las Vegas, USA Waldorf Astoria, New York, USA Emirates Palace, Abu Dhabi, UAE Villa d‚ÄôEste,¬†Cernobbio,¬†Italy Read the full report here. Got five minutes to spare? Want to tell us what life is like in your city? Take the Time Out Index sur

Ireland is offering artists a ‚ā¨325-a-week basic income

Ireland is offering artists a ‚ā¨325-a-week basic income

For centuries, artists have struggled to pay the bills. Being a creative might be your calling, but unless you come from money, it can be difficult to make any¬†headway at the start of your career. But that doesn‚Äôt mean it‚Äôs not worthwhile, and now the Irish government are going to provide artists with a basic income so they can pursue their craft to a higher level. It amounts to¬†‚ā¨325 (¬£270 or $350)¬†a week, and will be available to 2,000 artists over a three-year period. It‚Äôs hoped the scheme will boost Ireland‚Äôs cultural sector, with Miche√°l Martin, the Irish prime minister, saying: ‚ÄėIreland‚Äôs arts and culture in all its distinctiveness and variety is the wellspring of our identity. The Basic Income for the Arts is a unique opportunity for us to support our artists and creatives, and ensure that the arts thrive into the future.‚ÄôThe scheme aims to ‚Äėaddress the earnings instability that can be associated with the intermittent, periodic and often project-based nature of work in the arts‚Äô, which is a pretty thoughtful¬†assessment of the kind of issues artists¬†have long faced. Overall, a whopping¬†‚ā¨25 million (¬£21 million or $27 million) has been allocated to the scheme.It‚Äôs non-competitive, which means the quality of the work doesn‚Äôt matter. And because it‚Äôs a pilot, there‚Äôs the potential for the scheme to be expanded further if it‚Äôs successful. Recipients¬†will be chosen at random on May 12 ‚Äď so if you‚Äôre an Irish painter, musician, writer or something else entirely, apply via the

This seashell-shaped Airbnb in Mexico is straight out of a Salvador Dalí painting

This seashell-shaped Airbnb in Mexico is straight out of a Salvador Dalí painting

Really wanting to lean into the tropical vibes this summer? This Airbnb on the¬†Isla Mujeres, off the coast of Canc√ļn, Mexico, is the stuff of holiday dreams. It‚Äôs shaped like a giant white shell, framed by palm trees and overlooks a stunning swimming pool. It‚Äôs right by the beach, too, so you can relax by the ocean all day long.¬†The building itself ‚Äď designed by local architect Eduardo Ocampo¬†‚Äď is straight out of a Salvador Dal√≠ painting. The kitchen is tucked into¬†a nook of the shell, making you feel like you‚Äôve fallen inside an artwork. The beds look like the sort of thing a mermaid would fall asleep on.¬†And the¬†shower heads and taps are, of course, made out of actual shells. Photograph: Airbnb Photograph: Airbnb Photograph: Airbnb The property sleeps four and is actually split between two shell buildings, with a bedroom and living space in each ‚Äď but you can book the whole thing if you wish. Given all the decorative¬†touches are made of found materials (and totally homemade), you definitely won‚Äôt find anything like it anywhere else. Tempted to book a stay? Prices start at around ¬£230 ($295) a night, based on a two-night stay. Find out¬†more on the¬†official Airbnb listing.¬† Got five minutes to spare? Want to tell us what life is like in your city? Take the Time Out Index survey¬†here.

Flight cancellations at UK airports could ruin your summer holidays

Flight cancellations at UK airports could ruin your summer holidays

The aviation industry in the UK is going through a pretty chaotic time. Over the past few weeks, there have been a ton of cancelled flights, massive delays at baggage reclaim and seemingly endless queues at passport checks across the country. But you want to know the worst thing? It seems the chaos could spill over into summer and possibly even next year. The latest batch of cancellations has come from British Airways, which has scrapped more than 100 flights between now and September. Like other airlines, the operator has cited ongoing staff shortages, caused by higher-than-usual levels of employee sickness due to rising Covid-19 rates in Europe, plus difficulty in hiring new workers to replace those lost during mass lay-offs last year.  The routes affected by the latest series of cancellations are from the UK to Miami, Hong Kong and Tokyo. Miami services have been slashed by half (though American Airlines has promised to replace any cancelled flights), but all trips to Tokyo and Hong Kong remain suspended indefinitely. And it’s left holidaymakers worried that even more popular destinations might be cancelled throughout the summer.  BA has said it will provide vouchers for new flights, with passengers only entitled to cash compensation if the cancellation is due to staff sickness or if it was announced less than two weeks in advance. Our advice? Keep an eye out for further cancellations, right up until your date of travel. Got five minutes to spare? Want to tell us what lif

Could this giant crack split Africa in two?

Could this giant crack split Africa in two?

It looks like something from a fantasy film: a 15-metre-wide abyss, tearing the earth in two. The terrifying sight emerged in¬†Kenya‚Äôs Great Rift Valley after torrential rain and tremors.¬†That‚Äôs obviously pretty unnerving for locals, and now some¬†experts even reckon it could even¬†cleave the continent in two. Apparently, the¬†giant crack¬†was partially covered by volcanic ash, meaning locals didn‚Äôt realise the scale of the problem for some time.¬†Scientists estimate that the crack is¬†around¬†15 metres deep and appeared very quickly ‚Äď even splitting a man‚Äôs house in two, according to local newspaper Daily Nation.Beneath the Great Rift Valley are numerous constantly-moving tectonic plates, making the region very prone to seismic¬†activity. This crack is a visible part of the 3,700-mile-long East African Rift, which is itself made up of the Gregory Rift and the Western Rift. These are growing¬†larger, as¬†the Somali tectonic plate in the east and the Nubian plate in the west move away from each other.¬†Perhaps most shockingly, these two plates could eventually move so far apart that they¬†split, forming two¬†separate land masses out of Africa. While that sounds frightening, the timeline for that is extremely long-term ‚Ästwe‚Äôre talking around 50 million years. The effects of extreme weather events and the tremors from¬†infrastructure projects could¬†exacerbate the rifts, though, so expect to see more cracks forming in the region in the future.¬†In the meantime, locals are filling in the crack¬†wi

Now on the market: this truly magical (if slightly decrepit) 26-bedroom Welsh castle

Now on the market: this truly magical (if slightly decrepit) 26-bedroom Welsh castle

Looking to buy a house and got a chunky ¬£1.25 million ($1.63 million) to spare? Well, this charming nineteenth-century castle in Wales has just gone on the market ‚Äď and though the price tag may sound steep, it does¬†have a whopping 26 bedrooms. Probably worth it,¬†in other words. The Bryn Corach estate¬†has two and a half acres of grounds ‚Äď including a croquet lawn ‚Äď and boasts¬†breathtaking views over Conwy and Snowdonia. Inside, it‚Äôs all open fireplaces and vast French windows; outside, there‚Äôs a separate lodge house and a three-storey accommodation block, which previous owners used as a hotel. There is one downside, however: the property needs a lot of work. The estate agent notes that planning permission has already been granted to demolish the slightly shabby modern extensions, which were added in the early twentieth century, but the castle itself is a Grade II-listed building ‚Äď meaning you‚Äôve just got to live like royalty. Life‚Äôs pretty tough, huh? Want to give the property a closer look? Find out more via¬†the official listing.¬† Got five minutes to spare? Want to tell us what life is like in your city? Take the Time Out Index survey¬†here.

Revealed: these are officially Europe’s most walkable cities

Revealed: these are officially Europe’s most walkable cities

It may be a clich√©, but the best way to see any city is definitely by foot. No matter the location, walking is often cheaper, less stressful ‚Äď and much more conducive to the chance encounter. Few pleasures beat diving down a secluded backstreet and discovering a gloriously offbeat restaurant or shop. So it‚Äôs a shame so many cities these days appear to have been designed expressly for cars. Helpfully, a new study from hotel chain¬†Motel One has figured out which cities are best for those travellers fond of a good old ramble. It took the most popular tourist destinations in Europe, mapped out their most popular sights, then figured out how long it would take to walk between them. So, which city took the top spot? That would be¬†Bruges¬†in¬†Belgium. The list compilers worked out that you could everything from the historic¬†Begijnhof Bridge to the¬†brilliantly quirky¬†Frietmuseum ‚Äď which, as you may have guessed, is entirely dedicated to fries ‚Äď in just 29 minutes. Not bad at all.¬† Next up on the list is Manchester, where a 30-minute walk could take in sights like the¬†People‚Äôs History Museum, the National Football Museum and the Museum of Science and Industry. That‚Äôs a whole lot of learning. Other fun European destinations like¬†Dubrovnik, Amsterdam and Prague also¬†feature on the list ‚Äď plenty of inspo for your next holiday on the Continent. Want to know where else is good? Here‚Äôs the top ten in full: Bruges, Belgium¬† Manchester, UK Frankfurt, Germany Dubrovnik, Croatia Leipzig, Germany

Netflix could soon crack down on password-sharing

Netflix could soon crack down on password-sharing

Bad news for people still using their¬†ex‚Äôs Netflix login: it might not work for much longer. The streaming platform is cracking down on people sharing passwords, meaning that if you‚Äôre ‚Äėborrowing‚Äô someone else‚Äôs account, you might soon get logged out.¬†The streaming giant has hinted that while lots of people share passwords legitimately between family members, the practice is likely to be made more difficult. It‚Äôs thought that around 100 million households are breaking the rules, so the days of clandestine Bridgerton¬†binges are probably numbered.¬†The move comes as Netflix reported¬†a loss of 200,000 subscribers in the first three months of the year. That‚Äôs thought to be due, largely, to people unsubscribing due to the rising cost of living. The platform had¬†recently raised¬†membership costs and pulled out of Russia (a rather big marketplace) entirely, which couldn‚Äôt have helped. Now the firm reckons another two million users could quit by July.Netflix has already started charging¬†users in¬†Latin America extra if they share their password. Experts reckon that it‚Äôs likely the firm will roll out the measures worldwide in an attempt to grow its paying subscriber base. Yet another¬†thing to think about as the cost of living crisis bites. Got five minutes to spare? Want to tell us what life is like in your city? Take the Time Out Index survey¬†here.

Por qué este país mediterráneo es el más barato para las próximas vacaciones de verano

Por qué este país mediterráneo es el más barato para las próximas vacaciones de verano

¬ŅPlaneando ya una escapada para este verano?¬†En ese caso sabr√°s que hay un mont√≥n de cosas a considerar,¬†que si una escapada a la ciudad, quiz√° mejor unas vacaciones en la playa,¬†que si¬†cu√°nto tiempo tardar√≠as en llegar¬†en avi√≥n, o mejor ir en tren... Pero est√° claro que una de las m√°s importantes¬†es el coste total del viaje.¬† Y aqu√≠ hay algo que debes saber. Turqu√≠a, ese pa√≠s diverso, hermoso y muy soleado, es incre√≠blemente barato en este momento, con vuelos y alojamiento muy, muy asequibles. La crisis econ√≥mica que afecta al pa√≠s¬†ha afectado directamente a su moneda, la lira¬†que, tras el recorte de las tasas de inter√©s por parte del gobierno turco, ha ca√≠do¬†un 55 por ciento frente al d√≥lar en el √ļltimo a√Īo y la inflaci√≥n¬†ya alcanza¬†el 61 por ciento, por citar solo¬†algunas estad√≠sticas. Eso significa que, aunque los precios pueden haberse disparado localmente, la ca√≠da de la moneda hace que el pa√≠s se haya vuelto a√ļn m√°s barato para los visitantes extranjeros. Seg√ļn una encuesta reciente de Post Office Money, el coste promedio de una taza de caf√© en Marmaris, una ciudad tur√≠stica en el este del pa√≠s, es de solo¬†5 c√©ntimos¬†de euro (0,77 liras), mientras que un vaso de cerveza cuesta¬†13 c√©ntimos de euro¬†(2,01 liras).¬† La encuesta tambi√©n tiene en cuenta cu√°les son¬†las mayores ca√≠das de precios seg√ļn destino. Y frente a Sliema, en Malta, que se ha vuelto alrededor de un 5 por ciento m√°s barato, el coste de una escapada a Marmaris se ha reducido en un 36 por ciento. Eso signifi

Remnants of Halley’s Comet will soon flash their way across the night sky

Remnants of Halley’s Comet will soon flash their way across the night sky

Comets don‚Äôt get more famous than Halley‚Äôs. As you may well know, it was named after¬†Edmond Halley, who figured out that sightings of comets over Earth in 1531, 1607 and 1682 were probably all the same astronomical object returning to our skies at regular intervals. He correctly predicted that it would return in 1758, although he didn‚Äôt live to see it himself. The last sighting of Halley‚Äôs Comet was in 1986, and so sadly that means it won‚Äôt be visible in the night sky until 2061. But here‚Äôs some good news: on one night every year you can see the glowing trails of meteors ‚Äď produced when the comet enters our solar system and sheds layers of ice and rock ‚Äď flash across the night sky. This year the big night is May 5. These remnants of the comet are also known as the¬†Eta Aquarids, and every year the Earth passes through their trails, which collide with out atmosphere to create bright, fiery streaks in the night sky. Come May 5, depending on which part of the world you‚Äôre in, you could spot ten to 30 meteors an hour, for a few seconds at a time. On the night, the best bet is to head outside and use¬†the ‚Äėsquare‚Äô in the Pegasus constellation to guide you towards Aquarius. The Southern Hemisphere is better for viewing the phenomena, though you‚Äôre still likely to see around ten meteors an hour in the North. Head out at around 2am, wherever you are, so it‚Äôs dark as possible. It may take a few minutes to get used to the gloom, but then you should be all set. Wrap up warm, face east an

Why this Mediterranean country is your best budget holiday option this summer

Why this Mediterranean country is your best budget holiday option this summer

Planning a getaway this summer? There are a load of things to consider, like whether you want a city break or a beach holiday, or how long your flight or train might take. But just as important is how much it all might cost. So here‚Äôs a thing you should know. Turkey ‚Äď that diverse, beautiful and very sunny country ‚Äď is insanely cheap right now, with flights and accommodation both very, very affordable indeed. That‚Äôs because the country in the midst of an economic crisis, with the currency ‚Äď the lira ‚Äď having crashed. Last year the Turkish government repeatedly cut interest rates, thinking it might tame inflation, but in fact ‚Äď as per conventional economy theory ‚Äď it has caused the Turkish lira to¬†drop 55 percent against the dollar¬†in the past year and inflation has now reached 61 percent. Those are some stats. So, what does it all mean? Well, while prices may have soared locally, the currency crash does¬†mean the country has become¬†even cheaper for foreign visitors. According to a recent survey by¬†Post Office Money, the average cost of a cup of coffee in Marmaris, a resort town in the east of the country,¬†is just 59p (77¬Ę),¬†while a glass of beer is ¬£1.54 ($2.01). When you take into account currency conversions, prices for¬†a shopping basket of¬†holiday essentials came in at just ¬£24.91 ($32.45) in Marmaris. That‚Äôs much¬†cheaper than the ¬£39.07 ($50.90) average in the Algarve in Portugal, or the ¬£52.99 ($69.04) in Paphos, Cyprus. The survey also takes a look at the biggest price

Australia has scrapped all testing requirements for vaccinated travellers

Australia has scrapped all testing requirements for vaccinated travellers

As Omicron gradually appears to fade, international tourist destinations are reopening by the bucketload. But what about Oz? Well, Australia‚Äôs borders have been mostly closed for both inbound and outbound travel¬†since March 2020.¬†Finally, though, the country has reopened to visitors, meaning holidays ‚Äď and family reunions ‚Äď are possible again. And for the¬†vaccinated, travel to Australia has just got¬†much, much easier.¬†Double-jabbed visitors will no longer need to take a pre-travel PCR test. Previously, all vaccinated travellers are required to take a test 72 hours before departure, so it‚Äôs a big change. Now, all you need to show is proof of vaccination. Unvaccinated travellers, meanwhile, will still only be able to visit Australia in certain circumstances. They‚Äôll also have to quarantine in a designated hotel at their own expense. You¬†can read all the rules¬†here. Currently, fully-jabbed means two¬†vaccine doses, but as booster jabs are rolled out worldwide, the premier of the state of Victoria has warned that ‚Äėfully vaccinated‚Äô might soon mean three. Visitors with only two doses could face the prospect of being able to travel into Victoria, but not access restaurants, bars or shops. Keep your eye out for more developments. Experts are hoping that this will revive country‚Äôs struggling tourism industry, which has relied almost entirely on domestic visitors over the past two years. Cruises are finally returning to Australia‚Äôs ports, after two years of tourist boats being banned