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Mosu Hong Kong
Photograph: Fontaine Cheng

The 50 best restaurants in Hong Kong you have to try

Our list of the city's top restaurants to eat at this month

Fontaine Cheng
Written by
Fontaine Cheng
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April 2022: From April 21, dinner services will finally resume from 6pm until 10pm, and people will be able to dine in groups of four from the previous two. Visit our social distancing guide for regular updates to keep yourself informed about what's happening in Hong Kong.

To support the city's dynamic restaurant scene, we wanted to give recognition to some of the best eateries that continue to push through these times. From new restaurants and concepts to established eateries doing what they can to stay relevant, creative and interesting, read on for our pick of the 50 best restaurants and get some inspiration for where your next meal could be.

Eaten somewhere on this list and loved it? Know of a restaurant that should be on here instead? Let us know and share it with the hashtag #TimeOutEatList

50 Best restaurants in Hong Kong

  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • West Kowloon

What is it? Set to open on April 21Mosu Hong Kong is the offshoot of two-Michelin-starred Mosu Seoul, an innovative fine dining restaurant that serves imaginative Korean cuisine created by Korean chef-founder Sung Anh.

Why we love it: The food here will open your mind about Korean cuisine altogether and will likely pin it at the top of your experiences. Each dish is polished with next level execution. Signatures from the flagship, such as abalone taco, sesame tofu, and acorn noodles, are available, but there will be new dishes that embrace local seasonality and produce.

Time out tip: The restaurant, which is located on the third floor of M+ adjacent to the Roof Garden, enjoys some of the museum’s epic skyline views, so be sure to spend some time and walk around on this level.

  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? Chef Vicky Lau of two Michelin-starred Tate Dining Room, together with co-founder Romain Hertebreau and head chef Percy Ho, opened Mora, a soy inspired, French-Chinese restaurant located in Sheung Wan. 

Why we love it: Starring the soybean, which is considered a pillar of Asian cuisine and culture, Mora celebrates this unassuming ingredient in a surprising amount of ways. From the smoothest homemade soft tofu with Ossetra Caviar and other flavour enhancing condiments to chilled chicken soy milk bouillon noodles and stinky red tofu marinated crispy chicken, expect to be wowed by the many forms, textures and flavours of soy here and never look back.

Time out tipMora is currently offering a special tasting menu ($880 per person) for lunch in two seatings: 12pm to 1pm and 2.45pm to 3.30pm.

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  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? The first venture outside of Singapore for chef Julien Royer serves French dishes inspired by Royer's childhood, including some riffs on family recipes in PMQ.

Why we love it: The restaurant, designed by Andre Fu, is simply gorgeous. It replicates an old colonial home, with a tropical lounge on the ground floor and an opulent all-day dining room on the second. Dish highlights include classic angel hair pasta topped with Kristal caviar, sautéed frog legs, and the famed roasted Hong Kong yellow chicken as well as a more seasonal verbena Axuria lamb saddle with Jérôme Galis green asparagus, and perfectly cooked Pan-seared line-caught fish 'Riviera' style.

Time out tip: At the end of your meal, a treasure box of desserts is brought to the table to entice you. And entice it will so try not to fill up on the bread and save room for a sweet treat.

  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Central

What is it? Man Wah is the Cantonese restaurant of Mandarin Oriental Hong Kong which sits on the 25th floor of the hotel. Offering exquisite cuisine, including dim sum in the day, Man Wah is one of the top fine-dining Chinese restaurants in the city with a Michelin star under its belt and a stunning view of the skyline to boot.

Why we love it: Man Wah was recently given a huge makeover and the end result is absolutely gorgeous. The interior, in elegant dark azure tones, is accented with brass elements and Chinese embroidered art panels on the wall, adding a sense of refinement to the dining experience. But that's not all, the menu was also revamped with dishes that sing the song of Cantonese classics with understated elegance, all the while championing these age-old flavours and forgotten delicacies for a modern palate.

Time out tip: Seafood lovers can opt for the seemingly simple sautéed lobster cooked in a rich superior fish broth packed with flavour and umami, while those that enjoy local cuisine can try the Hakka-style braised pork belly with taro which shines a light on village cuisine in the most sophisticated manner.

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  • Restaurants
  • Indian
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

What is it? Helmed by chef Manav Tuli, Chaat serves up a fresh take on classic Indian street food and elevates favourites that are drawn from a variety of colourful flavours, transporting you all across India.

Why we love it: Chaat’s warm and lively atmosphere, combined with stunning cross-harbour views, make for a unique dining experience with exceptionally well-executed dishes. Highlights include a flavourful butter chicken and fragrant lamb dum biryani, but the pistachio lamb chops are honestly the best in town. 

Time out tip: To cap off this meal, enjoy a cuppa golden chai masala, or a glass of tawny port on their terrace, which will send warmth through your body instantly. 

  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Central

What is it? The same team behind restaurants like Hansik Goo and Whey opened modern trattoria Testina in collaboration with Trippa Milano from Italy in the recently renovated 8 Lyndhurst Terrace building.

Why we love it: Testina, which means ‘head’ in Italian, serves refined versions of classic Italian recipes with a nose-to-tail approach to their dishes. Former 8½ Otto e Mezzo Bombana Shanghai chef Marco Xodo serves up some excellent dishes including crispy fried tripe, tagliatelle with slow-cooked duck ragù, flavourful pan-seared pig head with salsa verde, and a seasonal berries tart (which most recently was local mulberries) with zabaione.

Time out tip: We usually tell you not to load up on the breadbasket because it can make you too full, but the focaccia at Testina is so good that it'd be an awful shame if you missed it. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Central

What is it? This casual neighbourhood bistro is created by chef Shane Osborn, who you might recognise from Arcane and Netflix's The Final Table, and headed by chef Neal Ledesma.

Why we love it: What's not to like about honest, good food. Absolutely nothing. That's why we love all the dishes at Cornerstone. Dropping trends for quality and seasonal produce, you'll find simple yet bold flavours here, cooked to emphasise the natural flavours and textures of each ingredient.

Time out tip: All the seasonal dishes here are reasonably priced from $108 and $278 and the early weekday set dinner (Monday to Wednesday) goes for an easy-going $488 per person.

 

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary Global
  • Lan Kwai Fong

What is it? The restaurant fuses Argentinian chef Agustin Ferrando Balbi's ancestra Spanish roots with his experiences in Japan, creating a unique blend of Spanish and Japanese cuisine.

Why we love it: The restaurant takes diners on a journey through dishes that evoke a sense of nostalgia and wonderful familiarity. In the most recent update of the menu, new dishes including Tardes en Palermo, with lobster, Kristal caviar, and Spanish plankton as well as the Mi Domingo Favorito dessert, with maple syrup and caramelised pecans, take on some of the chef's fondest memories. Meanwhile, the signature Caldoso rice (Sin Lola) – a tribute to Balbi’s late grandmother – is updated with lobster, cecina, snow crab and chilli, and does not disappoint.

Time out tip: The bread course is something else all on its own with bread from Bakehouse, infused whipped butter and El Poaig extra-virgin olive oil from trees that are over 1,000 years old.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? A Japanese omakase restaurant in Sheung Wan is helmed by master sushi chef Motoharu Inazuka.

Why we love it: Sushi Hare offers traditional Edomae-style of sushi with a touch of creativity that accentuates the natural flavours of the ingredients. The shari (sushi rice) has a great balance of flavour that matches exceptionally well with the seasonal fish and seafood. Sushi Hare may be extremely difficult to book, but definitely worth the wait.

Time out tip: If you bag yourself a seat at Sushi Hare, it's worth trying a bottle of the sake that the team recommends to go with your omakase, as it makes for a pretty wonderful dining experience.

 

  • Restaurants
  • Spanish
  • Wan Chai

What is it? The popular Wan Chai tapas bar 22 Ships offers a range of traditional yet modern multi-regional tapas dishes by chef Antonio Oviedo. 

Why we love it: The cosy and buzzy restaurant is perfect for devouring light bites with our favourites being the classic mouth-puckering gilda skewers and sardines ajo blanco, as well as newer dishes such as the baby octopus squid ink paella and large Txuleta steak, made for sharing.

Time out tip: Save room for their creamy burnt Basque cheesecake and enjoy the intense cheesy and charcoal burnt flavours in every bite.

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  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Central

What is it? As the name suggests, the restaurant serves tongue-tingling Sichuan cuisine with a menu consulted on by Chinese food historian Fuchsia Dunlop, whom you may recognise from Netflix’s hit food series Ugly Delicious.

Why we love itGrand Majestic Sichuan’s swanky supper club interior is full of nostalgic glamour. Think velvet booths, plush carpets and gorgeous wallpaper, but the kitchen, helmed by head chef Robert Wong, also impresses. Highlights include the bang bang ji, sweet and spicy pork wontons, beef with ten year-aged tangerine peel, and gong bao prawns with cashew, along with other fiery dishes with tableside service.

Time out tip: When you go to the washroom, be prepared to get pumped with banging pop tunes, as well as glasses of Champagne to sip as you leave.

  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? Headed by chef-owner Vicky Lau, Tate Dining Room is a refined yet relaxing restaurant that offers an avant-garde take on Chinese cuisine executed with French finesse.

Why we love it: Tate’s elegant and intimate atmosphere appeals as much to the sophisticated as it does to the adventurous eater. The tasting menu changes seasonally and is an 'Ode to' a single ingredient, the result of which is always incredibly impressive. 

Time out tip: The most recent ode is dedicated to the forest, expressed through the medium of mushrooms which not only possess extraordinary flavours but also comes with a dose of fantastic fungi education. Make sure you make it to the end which features fun 'magic mushroom' mignardises that are bound to surprise you.

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  • Restaurants
  • Causeway Bay

What is it? Much like the original in London, renowned British chef Simon Rogan brings his celebrated sustainable cuisine to Hong Kong in the form of Roganic. It was awarded a Michelin green star again this year.

Why we love it: A farm-to-table destination in its own right, Hong Kong's Roganic is made for urban-dwellers who are in need of a more refreshing, and less stiff, approach to dining. The tasting menus, both long and short, always impress with seasonal and signature dishes such as sea urchin custard with caviar, truffle pudding, and everybody's favourite soda bread with cultured brown butter always hit the spot.

Time out tip: To get a taste of everything, it's worth going for the full tasting (long menu $1,080) and although the wine pairing is great, it's the soft drink menu that really wows us.

  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Central

What is it? Estro, which means inspiration in Italian, is focused on Neapolitan cuisine but it's not all spaghetti and pizza here. The restaurant is helmed by Naples-born chef Antimo Maria Merone who has created a fascinating menu directed by his own memories and influenced by Italian history.

Why we love it: The dining experience here feels like a different world. First, the André Fu designed interior reels you in with its Naples-inspired aesthetic nuanced with old-world charm. Then the food, primed with chef's clever interpretations, takes you on a sentimental journey that is full of robust flavours. Highlights include a homage to the tomato, Buttons, a mix between eggplant parmigiana and ravioli, and a knock-your-socks-off Mafalde pasta in ragu Genovese of Montoro onions and short rib.

Time out tip: The six-course ($1,480) and eight-course  ($1,880) menus have everything you need including a bread course with a choice of different olive oils. It's worth asking for a little of all four so you can work your way from light to flavourful.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Central

What is it? Named after Kyoto-native and head chef Teruhiko Nagamoto, Nagamoto is a kappo-style Japanese restaurant that focuses on the essence of seasons, or ‘Shun’ in Japanese, which describes ingredients that are at the peak of their freshness and flavour. 

Why we love it: The ever-changing menu highlights the very best of the season, with the most recent featuring firefly squid, spring vegetables, young burdock, baby sardines, and more wonderful produce from Japan. Nagamoto also gives diners a more interactive experience with chefs at cooking stations demonstrating their skills.

Time out tip: Thanks to the calm vibes and minimalistic wooden-clad interior, Nagamoto whisks you away to Japan within moments of stepping inside, so you can come here to give your senses a moment to travel.

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary European
  • Central

What is it? Margo is a brasserie-style European restaurant with German influences from chef Mario Paecke's (formerly of Somm and Amber) upbringing.

Why we love it: Aside from the gorgeous interior, the restaurant offers brilliant bistro-style dishes inspired by the chef's European travels. For autumn and winter, the menu takes on a heartier format with dishes such as Hokkaido scallops with pumpkin, and celeriac with a rich, deep-fried boudin noir and Ercolini pear to sample.

Time out tip: The currywurst and frites are more of a snack to enjoy at the bar area, but it's just seriously too good to miss.

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  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Lan Kwai Fong

What is it? Carbone brings the ‘bada bing’ of New York-style Italian food to the city. As an extension of Mario Carbone’s New York restaurant, Hong Kong's own outlet is now run by head chef Jack Carson. 

Why we love it: You're always in for a good meal at Carbone, especially in the evening when the restaurant is atmospheric and lively. The dishes are consistent with a perfectly tossed Caesar salad, the crowd-pleasing spicy rigatoni vodka, and the Italian-style desserts that come out on a trolley for you to choose. 

Time out tip: When truffle season lands at Carbone, prepare your taste buds, and probably an elasticated waistband, for ample shavings on truffle eggs crostini, house-made truffle fettuccini with Sardinian butter and sumptuous morsels of ricotta tortellini.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

What is it? Run by chef-owner Hisayoshi Iwa (of Ginza Iwa in Tokyo) and his apprentice, chef Tsukasa Kaneko, Sushi Hisayoshi is a traditional Edomae-style omakase restaurant located conveniently inside Harbour City.

Why we love it: The menu features really fresh seafood and produce with highlights this season including steamed abalone with abalone liver sauce, shirako tempura, Kurama prawn, Pacific saury, and much more. The tasting dinner experience is priced from $2,180 per person but has 23 courses to savour.

Time out tip: There is a wasabi ice cream dessert at the end of the meal that is also worth trying.

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  • Restaurants
  • Pan-European
  • Sai Ying Pun

What is it? With a name like Bȃtard, which stems from the old French word for bastard, you’re not wrong in assuming that this wine-focused restaurant is a lot less stuffy than other formal French cuisine and wine establishments in Hong Kong.

Why we love it: The restaurant is helmed by Singapore native and chef Aven Lau, resulting in brilliantly creative dishes on its ever-changing menu. From a perfectly cooked blue lobster with a glossy orange saffron and carrot sauce to a rocher of foie gras glazed in cocoa and Madeira. Not to mention, pastry chef Natalie Eng has joined the team and comes bearing sweet delights of fior de latte gelato with fragrant fig leaf oil and a really rather stunning lemon tart.

Time out tip: The restaurant space also holds two of its own private karaoke rooms which can seat up to 15-20 people so you can sing while sipping the best wine.

  • Restaurants
  • West Kowloon

What is it? Offering an innovative take on Italian fine dining, Radical Chic is helmed by the executive chef Andrea Tarini and is one of the latest restaurants to grace the 101st floor of ICC.

Why we love it: Aside from the kick-ass views, you can also sample tasting menus for lunch and dinner which bring out the best of Italian produce and ingredients. The dishes are deceptively simple, boosted by immense skill and laborious technique. It's a soaring success of dishes including an immaculate carnaroli risotto that offers a different flavour of the ocean with every bite, crispy frog legs with the most vibrant tomato marmalade, and a pillow of rich, creamy tiramisu that just seals the deal.

Time out tip: If you're planning a dinner here, try to head there in time for the sunset. Sit back, sip on a glass of vino and let the stunning skyline prepare you for the meal ahead.

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  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Central

What is it? Chef Olivier Elzer from L’Envol at The St Regis Hong Kong launched his own restaurant on the 25th floor of H Code. Clarence occupies a huge 6,000sq ft space with four different dining areas, including the Raw & Wine Bar, Sommelier Room, Main Dining Room, and The Lounge.

Why we love it: The contemporary French restaurant presents a creative menu that playfully celebrates French classics with Asian cooking. Owing to methods of charcoal grilling, steaming, and cooking on a teppan, Clarence is able to serve a much lighter version of French recipes, including ‘Yakifrenchy’, which includes Japanese-style skewers featuring Challans duck confit, frogs legs pastis, snails Burgundy and ratatouille. 

Time out tip: Save room for the desserts because the crispy croffle (croissant-waffle pastry) with creamy Normandy ice cream and salted caramel is to die for.

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary European
  • Central

What is it? A sturdy European steakhouse helmed by chef British chef Nathan Green. Located in a basement, the restaurant feels like a bit of a secret, a member's club if you will, with an old-school steakhouse vibe with a high-tech meat-ageing compartment displayed at one end of the restaurant.

Why we love it: Meat plays a main role on the menu with dishes like steak tartare with bone marrow toast and prime beef cut to tear into, but that's not all there is. A tuna crudo with smoked eggplant and harissa adds a Middle Eastern contrast, while lobster and scallop ravioli brings the taste of the sea in full force. Other highlights include the soul-satisfying Wicks Manor pig's head and potato pie.

Time out tip: The dishes are filling but don't forget the sides such as beef dripping chips, Lancashire hotpot, and lobster gratin which are all really quite special.

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  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

What is it? The Legacy House at Rosewood Hong Kong is the hotel's Chinese restaurant offering refined Cantonese dishes that honour the classics.

Why we love it: The Legacy House offers a fine dining experience alongside a pretty splendid view of Victoria Dockside. This classy eatery celebrates Chinese cuisine with a menu rooted in tradition. Most recently, a seasonal menu by chef Li Chi-wai brought some classically inspired dishes to the spotlight including a complex and layered double-boiled eel with ham, mushroom and pepper supreme broth, and a sautéed toothfish, with spicy plum sauce.

Time out tipThe restaurant has seven private rooms which definitely add something to the dining experience. There’s also an outdoor terrace if you’re a sucker for that world-famous view.

  • Restaurants
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? A restaurant helmed by Singaporean chef Barry Quek (of Beet which has since closed and Return of Lemak in Basehall) that merges European techniques and Asian flavours with superb skill and finesse.

Why we love it: The tasting menu is truly impressive with clever layers of ingredients, textures and flavours in triumphant combos as seen in dishes such as charcoal-grilled local kinmedai with diced cuttlefish in a tangy tamarind sauce accompanied by grilled petai (stinky) beans and pickled banana shallot; an insanely good Bak Kut Teh-inspired New Territories pork rib served with pork heart and cabbage; and the softest buah keluak (black nut) brioche with buah keluak emulsion. 

Time out tip: The Maoshan Wang durian ice cream with caviar may seem like too much for some, but it just works. But if it's really not for you then the brown butter ice cream is just good, if not another must-try.

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  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? Chef Mingoo Kang, the chef behind two Michelin-starred Mingles in Seoul, opened his first venture outside of his native Korea, with a restaurant that brings the essence of refined Korean cuisine to Hong Kong.

Why we love it: Hansik Goo, which recently moved to a new location with a brand new artsy look, offers a well-designed tasting menu that includes creative renditions of traditional Korean dishes such as the soul-warming prawn cabbage ssam rolls in white bean soup, an enhanced version of the samgye risotto which is uplifted with mushroom mousse, and a Hanwoo (Korean beef) duo with guksu (noodles) that showcases a ganjang-marinated beef patty and perfectly grilled striploin.

Time out tip: Although the K-food here goes far beyond the normal Korean fried chicken, their version of KFC is still worth trying with its sweet and crisp yuzu-glazed exterior wrapped around juicy chicken.

  • Restaurants
  • Central

What is it? Run by chef Leonard Cheung, formerly of 8½ Otto e Mezzo Bombana and Bo Innovation, Cultivate offers a fine-casual dining experience with interactive elements and an ever-changing tasting menu.

Why we love it: Cultivate's cuisine is filled with unexpected flavours and unique combinations that you never would have thought of, let alone tasted. The dishes are clever, creative, and always come with a hint of Asian or Chinese elements, which are surprising but feel familiar at the same time.

Time out tip: Go for the most recent Anniversary Express (available Wednesday to Friday) or the Anniversary Full tasting menu (available on weekends also) which features much-loved dishes from the year that they've been open.

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  • Bars and pubs
  • Wine bars
  • Central

What is it? Somm, short for sommelier, is a casual restaurant and wine bar with a huge selection of over 1,600 Champagnes, wines, and sakes.

Why we love it: The menus are created to enhance the wine you're drinking. Highlights include a rather sumptuous aka uni french toast and a rich and satisfying dish of Japanese pork belly with BBQ sauce and Hakata cabbage.

Time out tip: On the weekend, try the 'Sommkind of brunch' which includes 90 minutes of free flow from the sommelier's selection of sparkling wine and wine-based cocktails. You should also make the most of the season with Challans duck breast with butternut squash or Bresse pigeon and foie gras pithivier.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? This Japanese restaurant focuses on kappo cuisine, which refers to food made by cutting with a knife and cooking with fire, so it's more than just sushi and sashimi here.

Why we love it: Located on the 29th floor of Connaught Marina in Sheung Wan, Wa-En Kappo offers surprisingly stunning views of Victoria Harbour from the intimate dining room. The food is just as impressive with a flavoursome local chicken and soybean milk soup and tempura trio of fish maw with mitsuba leaf, sardine, scallop and white fish paste, and botan shrimp, and more. 

Time out tip: The team here are warm and friendly, so you don't have to worry about the usual hush-hush of high-end Japanese restaurants. Just sit back, sip on a glass of sake and enjoy each dish as it comes.

 

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  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Wan Chai

What is it? Osteria Marzia is a pescatarian restaurant, headed by Italian-born chef Luca Marinelli, that specialises in the cuisine of Italy’s coastal regions. 

Why we love it: Expect bright and breezy coastal food, and an aquamarine interior to match, that transports you directly to the Mediterranean. Highlights from the menu include the light and crunchy seppia dish, made up of finely shaved cuttlefish with Sicilian herbs and bread crumbs, and a luscious tiger prawn and stracciatella ravioli.

Time out tip: The fun retro-style playlist makes you feel like you're on a road trip in Italy, so if you're into it, you can ask for the Spotify link and replay it at home.

  • Restaurants
  • Wan Chai

What is it? Bibi & Baba is serving up Nyonya, also known as Peranakan, food in Hong Kong. If you know the cuisine at all, you'll know that there will be plenty of vibrant flavours, spices, and colours waiting for you at the restaurant.

Why we love it: Signatures on the menu include some well-known favourites including laksa, nasi lemak, and beef rendang. Since head chef Ho Wai-kong, from Ipoh in Malaysia, took the kitchen reins, the menu offers more variety with an incredibly tender Hainanese chicken, a rich Nyonya fish head curry, and one of the best Singapore style chilli crabs (only available on their nine-course tasting menu) with deep-fried golden brown mantou you can find in Hong Kong. 

Time out tip: The noodle dishes are great for lunch, but for dinner, we suggest you go with some friends so you can mix and match these punchy Southeast Asian flavours with rice.

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  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary European
  • Central

What is it? Mono, helmed by Venezuelan chef Ricardo Chaneton previously of Mirazur in France and Petrus in Hong Kong, delivers contemporary French cuisine accented with refined Latin American flavours in sleek, modern surroundings. 

Why we love it: The signature dishes are all incredibly intelligent fusions of Latin American ingredients and flavours that combine the rhythm of South America with the skill and elegance of French cuisine. The tasting menu changes regularly, but our most recent highlights are Racan pigeon with a complex and layered mole, Brittany blue lobster claw, and a dessert made with their very own chocolate.

Time out tip: In a bid to help the planet, Mono has teamed up with ZeroFoodprint, an international non-profit committed to fighting climate change. In support of this initiative, they add on a 1% carbon tax to the bill to help the cause.

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary Global
  • Soho
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? The new Belon reopened in an elegant space on the lower side of Elgin Street, a revamp welcoming Baltimore native and chef Matthew Kirkley at the helm of the French restaurant.

Why we love it: Anyone who has been to the original Belon will always have a soft spot for it, but Belon 2.0 does something else entirely. More sophisticated in vibe and execution of cuisine, Kirkley has pushed for more in new signatures such as a delicately dressed Turbot with beurre cancalaise, Salade Gourmande, and Cervelas en Brioche made with great precision.

Time out tip: The signage is so discreet that you may find yourself walking back and forth a few times, so just remember to look up as it’s just above Ho Lee Fook.

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  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Central

What is it? Écriture is a contemporary French fine-dining restaurant, helmed by chef Maxime Gilbert, with two Michelin stars under its belt. 

Why we love it: With the restaurant’s open kitchen in the centre and floor-to-ceiling windows, diners can experience stunning views to go with the French culinary art. The menu, or Library of Flavours, change with the seasons but signature highlights include the likes of a showstopping caviar and uni tart, and akamutsu, wrapped in kombu from Brittany with verbena and fresh lemon that is steamed with sake over a hot stone.

Time out tip: The degustation menu at Ècriture is a full-on experience, so come hungry and expect to leave fairly full.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

What is it? As the first branch of Osaka's two-Michelin starred Japanese restaurant Sushiyoshi outside Japan, Sushiyoshi in Hong Kong has a lot to live up to. Thankfully, it does.

Why we love it: Chef-owner Nakanoue Hiroki is known for bringing modern and western techniques to his Japanese cooking and traditions, as evidenced by many of his new dishes including a uni and cheese gougère, an akagai nigiri which uses yam and egg yolk instead of rice, a uni with caviar and creamy scrambled egg, and much more. For a full taste of what chef Hiroki has designed, the new 19-course omakase menu will take you on a unique and exciting sushi journey to remember.

Time out tip: Sushiyoshi also offers lunch sets with a shorter menu and a more agreeable price tag. However, the omakase experience is definitely one worth treating yourself to.

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  • Restaurants
  • Pok Fu Lam

What is it? Connecting the world of coffee with food and wine, Interval Farmacy is an all-day dining cafe and restaurant opened by twin brothers and entrepreneurs Josh and Caleb Ng that you may also recognise as @twins_kitchen

Why we love it: The venue houses an urban farm, in collaboration with Farmacy HK, for microgreens and edible flowers that are handpicked for use in the dishes. Interval also blends Western and Cantonese cuisine really well in handmade pasta, wood fire pizza and main dishes on the grill including things like handmade tagliolini with local pipis and chilli garlic sauce, and a wood-grilled local three yellow chicken served with wood fire bread and homemade sauces.

Time out tip: Whether you're going for a coffee, grabbing a quick bite or sitting down for a meal, this spot is great to go to after enjoying a walk on the Waterfront Park or pre-movie.

  • Restaurants
  • Soho

What is it? Ho Lee Fook opened back in 2014 and gained great popularity over the years for its innovative fusion cuisine. After an eagerly anticipated revamp, Ho Lee Fook is back with a new look and new chef, ArChan Chan.

Why we love it: The menu has retained some old favourites but also taps into traditional Cantonese cuisine, more than ever before, while refining it with modernity and finesse. The dining room's retro fun interior also provides a great atmosphere with a mix of old-school jams and 80s Canto-pop to boot.

Time out tip: Try the perfectly cooked local razor clams with vermicelli, aged garlic and soy sauce. The crispy sand ginger three yellow chicken served with a refreshing take on the classic spring onion sauce is also excellent!

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? An intimate Japanese restaurant and independent venture helmed by chef Shun Sato, formerly of Fukuro, Ho Lee Fook, Belon and Armani/Aqua in Hong Kong.

Why we love it: Although the buzzy atmosphere would tell you otherwise, Censu is not an izakaya and offers a more food-focused and refined menu. Menu highlights such as the ika somen with sliced raw squid, green apple and daikon fermented white kimchi is a delicate dish that whets the appetite wonderfully, while the already popular Unigiri, which features a toasted onigiri topped with fresh sea urchin served in abalone dashi, is something to come back for.

Time out tip: The restaurant currently only takes bookings for tables of four or more. Otherwise, it's walk-ins only. As for food, it's also worth ordering the Japanese Oyster which is much bigger and meatier than oysters from Europe.

  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? An ingredient-driven Cantonese restaurant that offers the true flavour of Chinese food, thanks to high-quality products, in a beautifully light and delicate cuisine.

Why we love it: Lauded as Asia's and Hong Kong's best restaurant, The Chairman, which was also awarded its first Michelin star this year, is as popular as it was when it opened over a decade ago. The restaurant uses the best seasonal produce, mostly organic, and no MSG. 

Time out tip: If there’s one thing you must try it’s the steamed whole flower crab in aged Shaoxing rice wine and chicken oil, served on top of flat rice noodles which soak up all the aromatics and flavours. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Causeway Bay

What is it? Aulis is the development kitchen and chef's table inside Roganic that aims to create a more interactive dining experience with an exciting and everchanging tasting menu.

Why we love it: Driven by the seasons, thanks to relationships with local growers and suppliers as well as Simon Rogan's own farm in The Lake District, Aulis is able to tap into some incredible produce that lends fantastic flavours heightened by the skill and execution of the team. The season's highlights (as of writing) such as kohlrabi with apple, smoked eel and caviar, a pigeon and blackberry pithivier, and the most stunning coffee custard tart, are just some of the items that will send you into a satisfying well-fed stupor.

Time out tip: With only one sample menu at Aulis, you should simply trust it and enjoy it. If you love wines, the pairing offers an enhanced experience, but there is also a juice and tea pairing that works just as well.

  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Causeway Bay

What is it? Castellana prides itself on serving up authentic Piedmont cuisine using fresh ingredients sourced from the region. Expect a range of traditional Italian dishes with decidedly pronounced and rich flavours in true Piedmont fashion.

Why we love it: Led by Italian native chef Fabiano Palombini, Castellana always has some creative dishes up its sleeve, but it's their signature carbonara au koque, made up of homemade tagliolini served with 'au koque' carbonara and Vigezzo Valley cured ham, that we come for and trust us, it's worth the calories. They also update their tasting menus regularly including the Journey Around the World which includes some fantastic homemade pasta and the luscious Norwegian langoustine with Cristal caviar and Piedmont hazelnut.

Time out tip: You can also shop for the products featured on the menu at Castellana through their e-supermarket Owl of Minerva.

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  • Restaurants
  • Wan Chai

What is it? Located in the St. Regis hotel, L'Envol serves up high-end French dishes in an exquisite setting. The restaurant brings Michelin firepower too, as it's helmed by Olivier Elzer, formerly of Seasons and L'Atelier de Joël Robuchon.

Why we love it: It's always an elegant affair at L'Envol with knowledgeable staff, sommeliers, and service that is always on point. The same goes for the kitchen and the culinary prowess of both Elzer and his pastry chef Mandy Siu. Expect exemplary examples of refined French cuisine and you'll end up at L'Envol. 

Time out tip: You cannot miss either the cart for cheese or petit fours. As good as the main menu, you cannot leave without having a few bites to end the meal.  

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary Asian
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? Vicky Cheng, the visionary chef that puts Chinese-French cuisine to work, is the V in VEA (while celebrated Hong Kong bartender Antonio Lai is the A). The restaurant offers a distinct cuisine that aims to shine a light on Chinese cuisine created with French technique and execution.

Why we love it: Food-wise, there are tasting menus with six or eight courses that change regularly with the seasons. Signatures that do stay on the menu include a sea cucumber with kuruma prawn and fish maw with caviar and quinoa. What seems like odd pairings, is actually extremely well thought out. All the flavours are fine-tuned with finesse, and there's a sense of Hong Kong cuisine in every offering.

Time out tip: A vegetarian version of the menu is also available upon request, but menus can change without prior notification so make sure to let your dietary requirements known beforehand.

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  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary European
  • Central

What is it? Since opening in 2018, Arbor has remained one of the most exciting restaurants in Hong Kong offering a distinct Nordic-Japanese cuisine lead by chef Eric Räty.

Why we love it: The restaurant serves innovative dishes in forest-themed surroundings – the perfect culinary getaway in the heart of Central. Dishes, such as a roasted Brittany pigeon had us all stunned, with a tender and flavourful pigeon breast encrusted in Okinawan sugar and accented with Sichuan peppercorns and a rich jus.

Time out tip: Arbor's soft, warm and pillowy brioche is hard to resist and comes paired with two types of whipped butter infused with mentaiko and kombu.

  • Restaurants
  • Thai
  • Sheung Wan

What is it? Popular Thai restaurant Chachawan brings the Northeastern regional cuisine of Isaan to Hong Kong in a casual and relaxed setting.

Why we love it: Led by culinary couple Rungroj Chang and Narisara Somboon, Chachawan offers crowd-pleasing dishes including Gai Yang, a juicy grilled chicken thigh, and Pla Phao Glua, a whole salt-crusted seabass. Meanwhile, other signature dishes such as Goong Golae, made with tiger prawn in a dry red coconut curry and Sam Chan Tort Glua, a seriously indulgent deep-fried crispy pork belly dish served with tangy and spicy tamarind sauce, add a slight kick and even more flavour to the menu.

Time out tip: They also offer Chacha Lunch on weekdays with a selection of signature dishes like Phad Thai, Khao Pad, Gai Yung, and more, paired with a choice of Thai milk tea, Thai milk coffee, or ice lemon tea.

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  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Central

What is it? Replacing Guo Fu Lou in The Murray hotel, Mián celebrates the eight major Chinese cuisines. Named after the Chinese word for Cotton, and their Cotton Tree Drive address, the new restaurant is helmed by Sichuan-born chef Ronald Shao.

Why we love it: Thanks to the expanded cuisine, Mian benefits from more flavour profiles than before. Menu highlights include the Sichuan style poached tiger grouper with assorted chilis, seafood, cubed chicken and silky fowl in dan dan sauce, sweet and sour pork with dried pineapple and much more.

Time out tip: The a la carte menu is extensive so there is plenty to choose from, but they also have dim sum and executive business lunches available during the day. Word has it that a Chinese-inspired afternoon tea will also be introduced in the coming months.

  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Causeway Bay

What is it? Inspired by the flavours of Southern Italy, Keith Yam, previously of Tosca (now Tosca di Angeloand 8½ Otto e Mezzo Bombana, makes his debut as executive chef at Italian fine dining restaurant Giacomo in Causeway Bay.

Why we love it: There's nothing quite like this in Causeway Bay. Elegant design meets classical Italian style without ever being over the top. Plus the food is fresh and delightful with highlights including marinated gambero rosso in Champagne tomato sauce with Oscietra caviar, langoustine with matsutake mushroom, and Fassone beef tartare.

Time out tip: Do yourselves a favour and make sure you order the pasta dishes. The red prawn spaghetti chitarra and black truffle tagliolini are great contributors to your return.

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  • Restaurants
  • Fusion
  • Sai Ying Pun

What is it? Brut, which means raw in French, refers to the raw talent, passion and materials that go into making the wine bar and restaurant. Think funky and surprising wines paired with an international menu that blends old and new with East meets West creations.

Why we love it: This contemporary restaurant serves a curated menu filled with creative pan-Asian style dishes. Think Haw Flakes candy-inspired char siu with grilled pineapple, and creamy clams in a sake-infused clam chowder-style sauce with pickled kumquat and jalapeno. The space is intimate and highlights a modest menu with interesting wines that are mostly served by the glass and will almost always leave you pleasantly surprised. It's a comfortable space with none of the frills but plenty of friends to makeover good food and wine.

Time out tip: Head chef Gavin Chin is always cooking up a storm at Brut! and he's often got something in the making which means new dishes to return for. One of which, the miso and yuzu chicken wings, originated from the team's dishwasher.

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary European
  • Central

What is it? Modern European restaurant Arcane, with the owner and chef Shane Osborn behind it, is a cosy place, where friends, family, and business associates can be wined and dined. 

Why we love it: The offerings on the menu are solid, and Osborn does create some fab dishes that are worthy of praise. It's a space for those who understand the chef’s approach – and love it.

Time out tip: Thanks to its discreet location, Arcane enjoy a bit of peace and quiet away from the bustle of the city centre. Perfect for business lunches or even private events

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  • Bars and pubs
  • Hotel bars
  • Admiralty

What is it? What the food menu at this restaurant and lounge offers is in the name, and there is indeed a fine seafood menu with top grill items to try.

Why we love it: The quality of food is consistent due to the excellent execution from chefs Kenny Chan and Cary Docherty who bring their collective experience across Hong Kong and London to the forefront. In particular, the Sunday roast brunch is fantastic, but be prepared to book in advance as it's popular, to say the least.

Time out tip: A recent creation, in the form of a fish burger with panko-crusted sole fillet, has been the centre of attention as of late on social media. The burger is now (finally) on their Saturday three-course brunch menu, otherwise, you'll need to preorder two days in advance.

  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Soho
  • price 2 of 4

What is it? Happy Paradise is the brainchild of Asia's Best Female Chef 2017, May Chow, who also brought us Little Bao Diner and Second Draft in Hong Kong. 

Why we love it: In this funky, neon-punctuated space, sip on Chinese-influenced cocktails, while dining on modern takes of Canto classics, such as sourdough egg waffle with bottarga whip, Australian wagyu skirt steak on thick-cut rice noodles, and a delightful mochi apple pie. 

Time out tip: Chow always rustles up dishes based on the seasons including some that require preorder such as the lobster noodles with either Boston or southern Australian lobster.

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